The Strange Library by Haruki Murakami: A Strange Little Borzoi Book of Fun – Book Review

The Strange Library by Haruki Murakami is a Japanese surrealist children’s novel about a young boy, a girl, and a strange fucking sheep dude that are trying to escape a creepy library. This was my very first Borzoi book (i.e.: has unique emphasis on details such as card stocks, illustrations and overall craftsmanship of the book) and it’s one I won’t be forgetting anytime soon!

Parade by Shūichi Yoshida: A Slow-Burn Psychological Exploration of the Darkness Beneath Monotonous City-Living – Book Review

Parade by Shūichi Yoshida is a Japanese psychological mystery story about four distinct individuals who all reside in a small two-bedroom Tokyo apartment. How these four came to be together is a matter of happenstance due to life’s quirky humour. They end up developing a friendship that they don’t even realise exists.

When the Emperor Was Divine by Julie Otsuka: A Phenomenal Work of Asian-American Literature Exhibiting the Despair & Inhumanity of Second World War Incarceration – Book Review

When the Emperor was Divine by Julie Otsuka is a Japanese-American historical fiction novel that tells the story of a family that is uprooted from their home and put into an Internment Camp during the Second World War. Each tale is told from the perspective of a different person, which helps tell a story that explains the various traumatic experiences and harmful impacts that this devastating event had on Japanese and Japanese-Americans.

Sputnik Sweetheart by Haruki Murakami: A Stunning Work of Surrealistic Fiction that Centres on the Chaos of Longing & Lost-Identities – Book Review

Sputnik Sweetheart by Haruki Murakami is an own-voices Japanese surrealism fiction novel about a young woman named Sumire and her long-time best friend who is only ever revealed as “K.” They have an intimate, unfiltered sort of friendship where they like to have discourse on an array of topics including rather personal events and experiences as well as simple, harmless banter on the mundane.

The Deep by Alma Katsu: A Slow-Burn Spectral Tale of the Deep Sea – Book Review

The Deep by Alma Katsu is a historical supernatural mystery novel about a young woman named Annie who survived the sinking of the Titanic, only to find herself working aboard another ship, the Britannica, years later. While working on the second ship, she is reminded of her time on the infamous maiden voyage of the Britannica’s predecessor; memories that are further heightened when she bumps into a familiar face.

9 #OwnVoices Novels by Japanese Women for New Readers of the Genre

Since I receive a lot of questions from people about Japanese literature and how best to begin reading from it, I thought it would be neat to share recommendations that are perfect for an array of readers, whether the preference is for mysteries to contemporaries and even magical realism and fantasy. All of these books are translated fiction that is authored by women, who are some of my favourite writers from the modern age.

Earthlings by Sayaka Murata: A Brilliantly Disturbing Yet Revelatory Work of Literary Fiction – Book Review

Earthlings by Sayaka Murata is an own-voices Japanese fiction novel by acclaimed author of Convenience Store Woman. The story follows a young lady named Natsuki who as a child was an outcast in the eyes of her parents and sister, and whose only friend was a plush toy hedgehog named Piyyut. Piyyut explained to her that he was a visitor from a far away planet named Popinpobopia on a very special quest to help Natsuki save Earth.