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Noble V: Greylancer by Hideyuki Kikuchi – Book Review

Noble V: Greylancer  by Hideyuki Kikuchi is a Japanese, science-fiction, supernatural novel. It was released by Haikasoru (an imprint of Viz Media, LLC) in May 2013, and translated by Takami Nieda. Disclaimer: The book is a part of the Vampire Hunter D universe, written by the same author, and as such I don’t recommend this for anyone who is completely unfamiliar with the franchise. It does not take the time to explain anything, and the story is made for people who are specifically well-versed with the happenings of Vampire Hunter D novel series.

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⚰️ The novel was a hot mess, with brief portions of clarity.
⚰️ The plot kicked off as being one thing and then deviated into something else entirely, that had very little to do with the initial premise; as such I was left wanting much more in regards to specific story points.
⚰️ The political climate is untamed and chaotic, which can be used to create some fantastic political intrigue, however in this case it formulated a very disjointed atmosphere that made comprehending the allegiances and motives challenging.
⚰️ Aside from our main character, Greylancer, all of the other characters were filler-types, whose only purpose was to help advance Greylancer’s motives or individual depth in small doses.
⚰️ Prose can be awkward and horribly slow in regards to topics pertaining to conspiracies, and in moments without action or fighting it was terribly boring.
⚰️ The scenes (not too often) tend to jump around from one thing to another without much context at all.
⚰️ Greylancer is a ridiculously overpowered and over-the-top character, but it was one of the facets that I really enjoyed; his ultimate badassery has no bounds.
⚰️ Greylancer is also an intimately flawed person who is extremely difficult to empathise with, which makes him a wonderful anti-hero.
⚰️ There’s violence in abundance, which I fucking loved; it’s gloriously unforgiving in its brutality and vividness, which was my second favourite element of the book.
⚰️ The vampires aren’t a fetished or romanticised bunch of creatures, dripping in good looks and sinister, sensuous intentions. They are monsters who believe that humans’ sole purpose in life is to live as fodder for them and their whims; third part of the book that I adored so much.
⚰️ Overall, the narrative was disappointing for me as I had hoped to get so much more out of it, more so since I’m a huge Vampire Hunter D fan. I would recommend this for fans of the franchise who’d like a bit more background and understanding on some of the political factors that contribute to the serials’  universe, but as a novel it’s rather not great at all.
⚰️ I shall mention my disclaimer once more here: I don’t recommend this book to anyone who’s unfamiliar with the franchise, as it will be immensely confusing to you. You pretty much have to be well-versed with the universe to comprehend what’s going on.
⚰️ 2.5 lances outta 5!


If you would like to read some vampire stories that depict the creatures as monstrous and brutal  beings, then please check out the awesome recommendations below!

Vampire Hunter D Volume 1 by Hideyuki Kikuchi: Taking place in 12,090 A.D. and humans are crawling out of of 300 dominion by vampiric race known as Nobility. As they struggle against nightly raids by fallen vampires, each village hopes to get a Hunter, warriors who have pledged their laser guns and swords to the eradication of the nobility.  A slow-burn tale of twisted, dark dominion, and malevolent beings that are the only ones capable to taking down the Vampire Lords.

The Strain by Guillermo del Toro & Chuck Hogan: A visually grotesque series that depicts vampirism as a widespread virus caused by an unlikely source. It has paced and suspenseful storytelling that tightens the tension with each flip of the page. Vampires have found their most-terrifying forms when Guillermo del Toro puts his brilliantly wicked imagination to the classic tale.

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